6th Infantry Division Pictorial Review 1941

The following pages are from a pictorial review book published by the United States Army in 1941. This book, as well as the “Sykes Regulars” book that follows was donated to our organization by Robert E. Phelps, II, whose father, Colonel, Robert E. Phelps, Colonel (now deceased), served with the 20th Infantry Regiment of the 6th Infantry Division in the Pacific during World War II.  The pages contain all of the members of the 6th Infantry Division who were at Ft. Leonard Wood and assigned to a company in about mid 1941. Realize that not all soldiers assigned are actually photographed if they happened to be on leave, or otherwise not available to be present for the photos. Recognize, also, that most of these are group photos of the over 15,000 men in the Division. There are names, and the best way to search for someone is by a pdf search for the name.

6th Infantry Division in World War II

Here are the contents of the US Army Divisional Public Relations Book entitled “The 6th Infantry Division in World War II, 1939 to 1945. This book was donated to our organization by Robert E. Phelps, II, whose father, Colonel, Robert E. Phelps, Colonel (now deceased), served with the 20th Infantry Regiment of the 6th Infantry Division in the Pacific during World War II.

51st Field Artillery

Photos of the 51st Field Artillery.

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Members of Btry C, 51st Field Artillery Battalion November 1945 at Kwangu, Korea awaiting to be sent home. Courtesy of Arthur Tindall

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6th Infantry Division Post WWII (Korea to Vietnam)

Photos of service men and locations in the time after the second World War.

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Actor David Janssen (far right), served with the 6th Infantry Division during the Korean War period at Ft Ord, California. He did his basic training in Co K, 20th Inf. Regiment. Latter he served with the 6th Division Band. His highest rank was Corporal. Courtesy of ,The David Janssen Archive www.davidjanssen.net

The Tears of the Mothers of Japanese Soldiers

Mothers shed tears on both sides of the war. Sennibari or One-Thousand Stitch Belts were decorated with 1000 knots or stitches, and each stitch was normally made by a different woman. Senninbari were given as an amulet by women to soldiers on their way to war as a part of the Shinto culture of Imperial Japan. (Information from Wikipedia)

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